Fueled by Prayer

As our aircraft need fuel to operate, we as an organisation need prayer to keep us going. At the heart of all we do is a desire to see people transformed physically and spiritually in Christ’s name. Prayer is a vital part of this vision.

Prayer changes things. It’s been central to MAF since we began flying about 70 years ago, from people like you praying in your home or church to our pilots praying before each flight takes off. Would you join our growing family and pray with us?

Operations Update: 1. February 2021

Operations Update: 1. February 2021

We would like to inform our partners and customers about MAFs current status of operations and the progress since we shut down flying in Mar 2020 after our landing incidents. MAF has identified that the condition of airstrips was one of the contributing factors and as you are aware commenced fresh surveys of every airstrip based on ministry effectiveness and needs. While the restrictions imposed on domestic travel by the Government due to the global pandemic did affect our operations, we have been engaged in health patrols to remote communities as a part of COVID response and have carried out more than 80 medevacs. Though the international travel restrictions are affecting our training and return of staff, we have been working diligently to be able to return to full-fledged operations in order to serve our remote communities. The efforts of our ‘survey teams’ all through the year have resulted in us completing surveys of 136 of the 216 strips we regularly operate to. Planning and executing surveys need coordination between several agencies and we have been affected by the weather on several occasions. We are aware of nearly 80 strips and several new airstrips that still need to be surveyed and are consciously working towards the same. Thank you for your patience as we have worked hard to ensure the safety of you, your families, and your valuable cargo. As per the end of January 2021, we now have exactly 100 airstrips open. See the list below for details. Please bear with us as we have to balance the need for more surveys, the training of our pilots and the ongoing high demand for service and medevac flights. MAF is still intent on our mission of reaching isolated communities while at the same time doing this in the safest manner possible! Airstrips open for MAF operations as of 1 February 2021. East Sepik (8): Ambunti, Malaumanda, Samban, Tamo, Wewak, Wuvulu, Yagiap, Yambaitok Eastern Higlands (14): Aiyura, Ande, Aziana, Boikoa, Gema, Goroka, Guwasa, Marawaka, Owena, Simogu, Sindeni, Usarumpia, Wonenara, Wuyabo Enga (5): Kairik, Kompiam, Maramuni, Pyarulama, Yenkisa Gulf (3): Kerema, Kikori, Wabo Hela (2): Tari, Wanakipa Jiwaka (2): Koinambe, Tsendiap Madang (4): Madang, Nankina, Simbai, Teptep Morobe (7): Derim, Finschhafen, Gusap, Nadzap, Sapmanga, Wasu. Yalumet NCD (1): Port Moresby Sandaun (18): Angugnak, Buluwo, Edwaki, Eliptamin, Green River, Kwieftim, Lumi, Munbil, Nuku, Oksapmin, Sibilanga, Sisamin, Tadji, Tekin, Telefomin, Tumilbil, Vanimo, Yapsie Simbu (3): Bomai, Chimbu, Karimui, Manu Southern Highlands (1): Muluma Western Province (29): Aiambak, Awaba, Balimo, Bensbach, Daru, Debepari, Dimissisi, Dodomona, Fuma, Hesalibi, Honinabi, Kamusi, Kapal, Kawito, Kiunga, Lake Murray, Morehead, Mougulu, Nomad River, Obo, Rumginae, Sasereme, Suabi, Suki, Tabubil, Tapila, Wawoi Falls, Weam, Wipim Western Highlands (1): Mount Hagen Are you looking to book a flight? For direct calls to our bookings team, please use +675 7373 9999 (This number does NOT receive text messages or works with WhatsApp.) You can also reach our bookings department on WhatsApp. Send your booking requests to +675 70440433, or simply send a message and they will call you back. Do you prefer to write an email? Please use: [email protected] Our vision at MAF PNG is to see isolated people physically and spiritually transformed in Christ’s name by sharing God’s love through aviation and technology. MAF has operated in Papua New Guinea continuously since 1951, serving remote communities through aviation for 70 years. Using our Cessna Caravan, C208 aircraft we are able to overcome the physical barriers that prevent people in Papua New Guinea from having access to healthcare, education, safe water, and the Gospel, helping to bring physical and spiritual healing to the isolated people of this country. We serve the local communities, local church groups, missionaries, NGOs, development and relief agencies, and government departments who are working to change the lives of those living in remote areas.

A committed pastor family

A committed pastor family

Pilot Philipp Sutter shared: “Today (13 January 2021) I was very surprised to find a whole family from Dusin at the airstrip in Simbai, waiting to travel to Mount Hagen. It turned out to be a pastor family from the Nazarene church in Dusin, who have been accepted to the Nazarene Bible College near Mount Hagen. Pastor Thomson Gimalo, his wife and their four children have walked from Dusin to Simbai, which probably is a 3-day walk, as the airstrip there is currently closed, to start a 3-year bible school. Together with them in the picture are other Dusin passengers, one of them also a pastor. It was so amazing to see a whole family on the move called by God to a completely new place for them and MAF enabling them to travel quickly and safely the last bit of their journey into a new future. To me it was such an encouragement to meet this lovely happy family. Just a sign from God, that we are part of building his church. MAF makes a difference!” Are you looking to book a flight? Great news! You can now reach our bookings department at WhatsApp. Send your booking requests to +675 70440433. Simply send a message and they will call you back. Alternate phone number: +675 7373 9999 (Please note this number does NOT receive a text or works with WhatsApp) Do you like emails? You can always reach them at [email protected]

God was in it: New Year’s Eve Medevac

God was in it: New Year’s Eve Medevac

The last MAF aircraft in the air on New Year’s Eve, 31 December 2020 was P2-MAH with Philipp Sutter in the captain’s seat and Joseph Tua as a second pilot on the right-hand seat. Philipp shares some unexpected and unplanned events from this day: On the ground in Mougulu, just before taking off, we received a V2 Track message, asking if we had time and enough fuel to pick up a sick patient from Wawoi Falls to take him to Kiunga. Wawoi Falls is a remote village, located in the southern lowlands of PNG in the middle of the jungle, but next to the gigantic waterfall of the Wawoi River that originates at Mt. Bosavi (8,100ft) and flows to the Gulf of Papua. The distance from Mougulu to Wawoi Falls is about 40 nautical miles, but the flight path was in the opposite direction we intended to fly. We discussed it and decided that we could since we had taken an extra 60min of fuel out of Mount Hagen due to weather as we are in the rainy season currently. For this diversion, we would use 20min worth of fuel each way, leaving us with 20min over minimum fuel at our destination in Kiunga. Having received a report of good weather from Kiunga we decided to do the extra leg, which turned out to be very helpful for a young 10year-old boy, named Mark, who had fallen out of a tree a week ago and broke his right leg above the knee. He was in a lot of pain and without a cast for a full week already. The medevac kit we had onboard came in very handy. It provided an inflatable mattress he could lie on and the harness system secured him for the flight. The father would hold his leg up as this caused the least amount of pain for Mark. In Wawoi Falls we decided to take-off from runway31, but as we lined up, there were lots of clouds and rain on our departure track. We taxied back for a departure from runway 13 and as we came to the line-up position, we saw our temperature gun, which we use for COVID-19 precaution procedures, laying on the ground. We had put it on the wing strut but forgot to take it with us. Joseph manned the breaks and we feathered the prop, as I went out to grab it – I guess God just put the rain and clouds in our departure route so that we had to come back and find the temperature gun. As we flew towards Suabi to pick up some other sick patients, the weather there was very bad with lots of rain and clouds all the way down to the trees. We were unable to land and had to fly straight to Kiunga. Via HF radio we advised Lakis, our base manager in Kiunga to call the ambulance. As we landed a Toyota Landcruiser approached and with the base’s scoop stretcher, we lifted Mark off the airplane and straight into the “ambulance.”